April 2012


By Andy Goldsworthy

Format: print

View in the Library Catalog

Andy Goldsworthy Digital Catalog

Time Magazine Interview with the Artist

Publisher’s Description
Andy Goldsworthy’s Passage focuses on the journeys that people, rivers, landscapes, and even stones take through space and time…this beautiful book is an eloquent testament to Goldsworthy’s determination to deepen his understanding of the world around him, and his relationship with it, through his art. Read more…

More on Andy Goldsworthy in the Library’s Collection:

The Art of Andy Goldsworthy: Complete Works / William Malpas

Rivers and Tides: Working with Time (DVD)

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By Martin Kemp

Format: print

View in the Library Catalog

Author’s Website

The Da Vinci Detective (includes an interview with Martin Kemp)

Description (from Amazon.com)
Martin Kemp’s provocative essays on the interplay between art and science have been entertaining readers of Nature, the world’s leading journal for the announcement of scientific discoveries, since 1997. These short, illustrated, highly regarded essays generally focus on one visual image from art or science and provide an evocative and erudite investigation into shared motifs in the two disciplines. Gathered together here with a delightfully rich introduction by the author, the essays take our understanding to an exciting new level as they transgress the traditional boundaries between art and science.
Read more…

Also in the Mitchell College Library:

Seen/unseen : art, science, and intuition from Leonardo to the Hubble telescope by Martin Kemp

A trilogy composed of Shapes, Flow, and Branches

By Philip Ball

Format: print

View in the Library Catalog

Author’s Website

The Paisley Leopard: a book review in American Scientist

Publisher’s Description
Patterns are everywhere in nature – in the ranks of clouds in the sky, the stripes of an angelfish, the arrangement of petals in flowers. Where does this order and regularity come from? It creates itself. The patterns we see come from self-organization. Whether living or non-living, scientists have found that there is a pattern-forming tendency inherent in the basic structure and processes of nature, so that from a few simple themes, and the repetition of simple rules, endless beautiful variations can arise. Part of a trilogy of books exploring the science of patterns in nature, acclaimed science writer Philip Ball here looks at how shapes form. Read more…

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